a-gnosis
a-gnosis:

Another doodle with Persephone inspired by The Narcissus and the Pomegranate - An Archaeology of the Homeric Hymn to Demeter by Ann Suter. (It shows that this is an older drawing. In the more recent ones Demeter has dark brown hair instead of black.)
Suter believes that Persephone lies to her mother to keep a good relationship with her when she says that she was forced to eat the pomegranate seeds (since when the poet of the hymn earlier told us how Hades gave Persephone the seeds, there was no mention of force). Well, that can only be speculated upon (like pretty much everything else in this book), but my interpretation of Persephone does that sort of thing pretty often. She’s convinced that her mother never would accept her “darker” sides and she doesn’t want to break her heart, so she does her best to withhold certain things from her.
I’ve always thought that Persephone’s Underworld aspect is what makes her interesting. Persephone in the Iliad and the Odyssey is quite different from Persephone in the Hymn. In the two first poems she’s just a powerful Underworld goddess. In the Odyssey she’s almost depicted as more powerful than Hades, since she is the one who does things. SHE sends forth the shades of the dead to Odysseus and the dead seer Teiresias has his wits intact because SHE has honoured him that way. There is no connection made between Demeter and Persephone and Persephone is never mentioned as a goddess of fertility or rebirth.
And since The Iliad and the Odyssey are believed to be at least onehundred years older than the Hymn, Suter sees this as one of the arguments for that Persephone once was a powerful and independent goddess.

a-gnosis:

Another doodle with Persephone inspired by The Narcissus and the Pomegranate - An Archaeology of the Homeric Hymn to Demeter by Ann Suter. (It shows that this is an older drawing. In the more recent ones Demeter has dark brown hair instead of black.)

Suter believes that Persephone lies to her mother to keep a good relationship with her when she says that she was forced to eat the pomegranate seeds (since when the poet of the hymn earlier told us how Hades gave Persephone the seeds, there was no mention of force). Well, that can only be speculated upon (like pretty much everything else in this book), but my interpretation of Persephone does that sort of thing pretty often. She’s convinced that her mother never would accept her “darker” sides and she doesn’t want to break her heart, so she does her best to withhold certain things from her.

I’ve always thought that Persephone’s Underworld aspect is what makes her interesting. Persephone in the Iliad and the Odyssey is quite different from Persephone in the Hymn. In the two first poems she’s just a powerful Underworld goddess. In the Odyssey she’s almost depicted as more powerful than Hades, since she is the one who does things. SHE sends forth the shades of the dead to Odysseus and the dead seer Teiresias has his wits intact because SHE has honoured him that way. There is no connection made between Demeter and Persephone and Persephone is never mentioned as a goddess of fertility or rebirth.

And since The Iliad and the Odyssey are believed to be at least onehundred years older than the Hymn, Suter sees this as one of the arguments for that Persephone once was a powerful and independent goddess.

a-gnosis
a-gnosis:

Hades and Persephone. The last drawing I made while I was reading The Narcissus and the Pomegranate - An Arcaeology of the Homeric Hymn to Demeter by Ann Suter. Persephone has probably recently returned to the Underworld and tells Hades about all the crazy shit their family has been up to.
As I’ve mentioned, Suter believes that the elements of a coming-of-age initiation that scholars see in the Hymn were originally part of the renewal of the earth’s fertility through the sympathetic magic of a hieros gamos (sacred marriage). One of her arguments seems to be that Hades’s and Persephone’s marriage is quite strange:
"She (Persephone) does not stay in her husband’s oikos (household), rather, she spends most of her time with her premarital family and associates, traveling to and from them while her husband stays at home. She does not spin or weave, the typical occupations of the proper Greek wife, nor are we told that she is ever taught these skills. Finally, she never has children, which is the final stage of female coming-of-age and is essential to the perpetuation of the community."
As I’ve said many times before, these things can only be speculated upon and I mostly read the book for inspiration and entertainment, but that’s one thing that I like about Hades and Persephone. That their relationship was a bit “strange”. Strange and yet quite well-functioning.
Anyway, according to Suter, the sexual union of Hades and Persephone in the Underworld is rather an archetypical act of fertility magic (or rather, the Hymn retain elements from an earlier story about a hieros gamos). Interestingly enough, the inhabitants of Sicily seem to have established the celebration of Persephone’s return to the Underworld at about the time when the fruit of the corn was found to come to maturity, implying that the cause of the maturation of the grain was her reunion with Hades.
Oh, and a funny thing about pomegranates… We often hear that the fruit was a symbol of marriage and fertility and sacred to Hera and Aphrodite as well, but did you know that it was also used in ancient times as an abortificant or contraceptive? There’s actually one theory suggesting that Persephone’s eating the pomegranate seeds indicates her wish not to have children. I just have to use that in my comics some day.

a-gnosis:

Hades and Persephone. The last drawing I made while I was reading The Narcissus and the Pomegranate - An Arcaeology of the Homeric Hymn to Demeter by Ann Suter. Persephone has probably recently returned to the Underworld and tells Hades about all the crazy shit their family has been up to.

As I’ve mentioned, Suter believes that the elements of a coming-of-age initiation that scholars see in the Hymn were originally part of the renewal of the earth’s fertility through the sympathetic magic of a hieros gamos (sacred marriage). One of her arguments seems to be that Hades’s and Persephone’s marriage is quite strange:

"She (Persephone) does not stay in her husband’s oikos (household), rather, she spends most of her time with her premarital family and associates, traveling to and from them while her husband stays at home. She does not spin or weave, the typical occupations of the proper Greek wife, nor are we told that she is ever taught these skills. Finally, she never has children, which is the final stage of female coming-of-age and is essential to the perpetuation of the community."

As I’ve said many times before, these things can only be speculated upon and I mostly read the book for inspiration and entertainment, but that’s one thing that I like about Hades and Persephone. That their relationship was a bit “strange”. Strange and yet quite well-functioning.

Anyway, according to Suter, the sexual union of Hades and Persephone in the Underworld is rather an archetypical act of fertility magic (or rather, the Hymn retain elements from an earlier story about a hieros gamos). Interestingly enough, the inhabitants of Sicily seem to have established the celebration of Persephone’s return to the Underworld at about the time when the fruit of the corn was found to come to maturity, implying that the cause of the maturation of the grain was her reunion with Hades.

Oh, and a funny thing about pomegranates… We often hear that the fruit was a symbol of marriage and fertility and sacred to Hera and Aphrodite as well, but did you know that it was also used in ancient times as an abortificant or contraceptive? There’s actually one theory suggesting that Persephone’s eating the pomegranate seeds indicates her wish not to have children. I just have to use that in my comics some day.

thesmilingspider

Bringer of Spring

thesmilingspider:

asphodelon:

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It’s the First Day of Spring, and Persephone is preparing to depart for the upper world.  A century may have passed since she made the famous compromise, but saying farewell is still far from easy.

Bringer of Spring is a collaboration between me and my lovely friend kata-chthonia, awesome writer and author of Receiver of Many.  It’s been three months in the making, so I’m very excited to finally show it to everyone.  Please click the “Read More” to see the rest, and I hope you enjoy! :)

(Apologies in advance to mobile users. There are lots of images!)

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Read More

I binge-read Receiver of Many. 250k words in four days.

I read it two years ago when I had a smaller attention span.

I binge-read Receiver of Many. I’m leaving the last 10 chapters for after my MCAT as an incentive to study hard.

Haha. If Persephone Praxidike can wait 6 months to see her man, I can wait 1.5 weeks to read Receiver of Many