Anonymous asked:

Spirit is always glittery, and never goes away ;) so write away!

I’ll keep that in mind as I slog through the arduous editing I’ll have to do in order to turn the manuscript into two books. ;)

Anonymous asked:

How does Aphrodite look to Hades?

To him, I have a feeling that she is a chameleon, much in the way she demonstrated to Persephone. In other words, he would see her depending on which of her sexual partners she is with. (Red hair & grey eyes with Ares, blonde & blue eyes with Hermes)

If she were around Persephone, she would appear as she did in the Olympus chapter of RoM. I think that if she were alone in a room with Hades, Aphrodite would will herself to look disturbingly similar to his wife.

j4ndr4
a-gnosis:

My father gave me the heavens  and he gave me the earth.  I am Inanna!  Which god compares with me?
(Read the rest of the hymn here.)
Even though Greek mythology is the love of my life, I’m also quite fond of Mesopotamian mythology. So when there was a new Swedish translation of the Sumerian hymns to Inanna published a couple of years ago, I bought it right away.
Inanna was the goddess of love, fertility and warfare, but she had a very versatile personality and was seldom content with the role she had been given (and you can see from the cited passage above that she was a quite cocky lady). In the story “Inanna and Enki” she visits Enki, the god of wisdom, and makes him drunk in order to make him give her more power and more knowledge. The most famous myth, though (and probably my personal favourite) is “Inanna’s Descent to the Underworld” (the Underworld tend to be a part of my favourite myths). Inanna is the earliest god we know of who descends to the land of the dead, and who after a short period of time is resurrected and comes back to the living.

a-gnosis:


My father gave me the heavens 
and he gave me the earth. 
I am Inanna! 
Which god compares with me?

(Read the rest of the hymn here.)

Even though Greek mythology is the love of my life, I’m also quite fond of Mesopotamian mythology. So when there was a new Swedish translation of the Sumerian hymns to Inanna published a couple of years ago, I bought it right away.

Inanna was the goddess of love, fertility and warfare, but she had a very versatile personality and was seldom content with the role she had been given (and you can see from the cited passage above that she was a quite cocky lady). In the story “Inanna and Enki” she visits Enki, the god of wisdom, and makes him drunk in order to make him give her more power and more knowledge. The most famous myth, though (and probably my personal favourite) is “Inanna’s Descent to the Underworld” (the Underworld tend to be a part of my favourite myths). Inanna is the earliest god we know of who descends to the land of the dead, and who after a short period of time is resurrected and comes back to the living.

whenwolfsbaneblooms

whenwolfsbaneblooms:

gizkasparadise:

Rules: In a text post, list ten books that have stayed with you in some way. Don’t take but a few minutes, and don’t think too hard — they don’t have to be the “right” or “great” works, just the ones that have touched you. Tag [ten] friends, including me, so I’ll see your list. Make sure you let your friends know you’ve tagged them.

Tagged by Gizkasparadise (So not expecting it, thank you sweetheart)

1) Dead Beat by Jim Butcher. This book, for all the crazy-bad shit that happens is a surprising amount of fun, and it’s one of my go-to books for Halloween for it’s Crowning Moment Of Awesome alone. 

2) Ink Exchange by Malissa Marr. This is the book that really got me into threesomes as relationships, and by the end of the series it all works out and ugh. This book is also one of the man reasons I’m so in favor of darkness =/= evil.

3) Queen of the Darkness by Anne Bishop. Words can’t truly express what I feel about this book, it’s just not enough.

4) The Amber Spyglass by Phillip Pullman. Much like Queen this book just gets to me, Lyra’s speech gets me every time.

5) Beguilement by Lois McMaster Bujold. This is what I like to call an ‘adorable book’, which doesn’t mean it doesn’t deal with serious things (because this whole series definitely does), it’s just that the way Bujold writes her main couple is…overwhelmingly cute and all too real. 

6) Not Quite A Lady by Loretta Chase. A ‘true’ romance book was going to make it’s way onto this list eventually. It too is an ‘adorable book’, but this one is just effortlessly light and not at all serious. And Darius and Charlotte are just too serious and adorable for their own goods.

7) The Historian by Elizabeth Kostova and Vlad: The Last Confession by C.C. Humphreys. While these are two seperate books I’m including them as one, because they deal with the same subject: Vlad Dracula, but they manage to deal with him in two completely different ways that is just goes to show you how you can take the same information and have it come out completely different.

8) Maphead by Ken Jennings. This book got me into maps, making them for my stories and wanting them on my walls as art.

9) Tuesday by David Weisner.  …While it is most definitely a children’s book, but in a way this was the first book I ever ‘read’ and I still pull it out every once in a while to flip through and enjoy.

10) Receiver of Many by Kata Chthonia. While this isn’t a published novel yet I’m including it anyways, because this is how mythology retelling should be; lush, interesting, and firmly rooted in the culture it came from.

As for who I’m gonna tag: unitedkingdom-orgy, t3hraeraeriver-souldoitall-againbyheart, Bluandorange, Peppers-pray, Comicallycoolalecciobyaswhat-a-cute-stile, and rantsofafangirl.

Wow! That is a huge compliment and I’m kind of floored that my story was included in a favorites list like this! :D

hellenismo
hellenismo:

Πέμπτη Ἱσταμένου, V dayFrom today’s sunset: fifth day of Metageitnion."Beware of all the fifth days; for they are harsh and angry; it was on the fifth, they say, that the Erinyes assisted at the bearing of Horkos, whom Eris bore, to be a plague on those who take false oath.""Shun the fifth days: i.e. the lunar days. We have heard from the Pythagoreans that the number five is number of Dike, and among them are told the causes of this..as She punishes all those who stray from the divine law, as told by Plato (Laws IV, 716a).”Scholia to Hesiod, Erga, 802-804(Fortuna Nemesis with griffin and wheel; in the Würzburg Martin von Wagner Museum…)

hellenismo:

Πέμπτη Ἱσταμένου, V day
From today’s sunset: fifth day of Metageitnion.

"Beware of all the fifth days; for they are harsh and angry; it was on the fifth, they say, that the Erinyes assisted at the bearing of Horkos, whom Eris bore, to be a plague on those who take false oath."
"Shun the fifth days: i.e. the lunar days. We have heard from the Pythagoreans that the number five is number of Dike, and among them are told the causes of this..as She punishes all those who stray from the divine law, as told by Plato (Laws IV, 716a).”
Scholia to Hesiod, Erga, 802-804

(Fortuna Nemesis with griffin and wheel; in the Würzburg Martin von Wagner Museum…)